November 28, 2020

GH¢225, the price of ‘Apotoyewa’ in the US

The ‘Asanka’ is usually used for grinding spices and other ingredients for cooking

 

Asanka Grinding Bowl SldoThe ‘Asanka’ is usually used for grinding spices and other ingredients for cooking

Call it the local blender, otherwise, the traditional grinding bowl, but most typical Ghanaians would prefer the local name ‘Asanka’ or ‘apotoyewa’.

The traditional earthenware bowl, made of dug clay and normally low fire, which usually works with a wooden pestle, the ‘tapoli’, is used in Ghana and arguably, other African countries for grinding food ingredients, spices and generally for cooking.

The ‘Asanka’ is very common in every part of the country, very affordable and used in virtually every home, sometimes, as a complement to the electronic blender.

It may usually range from 5 to about 20 Ghana cedis at markets in Ghana. Interestingly, this same unique artifact found in Ghana is being sold in the United States for about 30 to 50 dollars. Typically, one would get an Asanka in the US from about GH¢225 to GH¢282.

Etsy, an American e-commerce website, focused on handmade and vintage items and craft supplies described this as the local blender, with the price tag attached as USD 39.99.

Source: www.ghanaweb.com
750

GH¢225, the price of ‘Apotoyewa’ in the US

The ‘Asanka’ is usually used for grinding spices and other ingredients for cooking

 

Asanka Grinding Bowl SldoThe ‘Asanka’ is usually used for grinding spices and other ingredients for cooking

Call it the local blender, otherwise, the traditional grinding bowl, but most typical Ghanaians would prefer the local name ‘Asanka’ or ‘apotoyewa’.

The traditional earthenware bowl, made of dug clay and normally low fire, which usually works with a wooden pestle, the ‘tapoli’, is used in Ghana and arguably, other African countries for grinding food ingredients, spices and generally for cooking.

The ‘Asanka’ is very common in every part of the country, very affordable and used in virtually every home, sometimes, as a complement to the electronic blender.

It may usually range from 5 to about 20 Ghana cedis at markets in Ghana. Interestingly, this same unique artifact found in Ghana is being sold in the United States for about 30 to 50 dollars. Typically, one would get an Asanka in the US from about GH¢225 to GH¢282.

Etsy, an American e-commerce website, focused on handmade and vintage items and craft supplies described this as the local blender, with the price tag attached as USD 39.99.

Source: www.ghanaweb.com
750

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